entrale

Question: How can we streamline the recruitment process for persons of disabilities to be as inclusive as possible?

Our Response:

Éntrale is a digital platform situated in Mexico that promotes the labor inclusion of people with disabilities by serving as the link between companies, civil society organizations and people with disabilities. Given that they operate in the space of supporting accessibility and inclusivity, they felt the need to make the selection and hiring process facilitated through their platform as inclusive as possible. Although they were doing a good job, there’s always room for improvement, so we conducted initial interviews with a group of people with disabilities and a group of Human Resources recruiters through Éntrale. These interviews helped us identify and map the emotions that participants experience during each stage of the recruitment process. This led us to the next question: where and when in the selection process are good practices obstructed, and why?   

The Approach:

To find the answer we conducted a literary research on emotions, compassion, empathy, burnout in Human Resources and the current situation of people with disabilities and employability in Mexico. We then analyzed and coded the information that emerged during the interviews. The methodology we used for this research was Experience-Based Co-Design (EBCD) in which we seek to make inclusive changes through the integration of emotions and the participatory design of each of the people involved in the selection process. 

 

The Outcome:

The results showed that recruiters and people with disabilities frequently experience emotions of frustration, fear, uncertainty, bewilderment and anxiety after interviews. We conclude that this happens because after interviews, in many companies, there is no service that notifies people with disabilities that they have not been hired. Both recruiters and candidates have a burnout and a lack of communication. The solution we provided was to implement a service to accompany people with disabilities throughout their selection process, especially when they are not hired.